Author Rating: A

When I indicate “read” in this instance, I actually mean listened to Librivox recordings. I am very surprised that I have never read anything by Burnett (1849-1924). She was left out of what I thought was a comprehensive study of 19th century English literature. I guess the men who organized the list of who is important did not consider her or her subject matter important. Perhaps because, according to the Washington Post at the time of her divorce in 1898, she had “advanced ideas regarding the duties of a wife and the rights of women.” (Gretchen Gerzina, Frances Hodgson Burnett: the unexpected life of the author of The Secret Garden, pg 204)

While Burnett is best known for what are considered children’s stories, she is much more than that. Further, what are deemed “children’s stories” are belittled by that categorization. Her stories are beautifully rendered studies of the lives of women.

The Secret Garden (read 81/2014) Recommended

I listened to the Librivox reading by Caroline Griggs. It is a wonderful story, and Ms. Griggs was a perfect reader. This is not a book to be ignored because it is labeled “children’s literature.”

The Shuttle (read 9/1/2014)

A novel set during the late 19th century when young, wealthy American women were marrying titled but often poor Englishmen. The “shuttle” is a reference to the back-and-forth trans-Atlantic trips made by the rich American women and their would-be titled English suitors. The heroine is Bettina “Betty” Vanderpoel, who travels to England to find her sister who married one of those poor but titled gentlemen and had seemingly forgotten her American family. Betty is a strong, delightful character who, through intelligence and compassion, rights wrongs and finds true love. Burnett is masterful.

The Making of a Marchioness and The Methods of Lady Walderhurst (aka Emily Fox-Seton (read 8/10/2014)

Burnett’s two novels describe the difficulties of women and their limited options. I listened to a Librivox recording, and although these are two novels they are run together into one under the title Emily Fox-Seton.

A Lady of Quality (read 8/20/2014)

Also listened to a Librivox reading. This is a historical novel set in, I believe, the 16th century. Somewhat reminescent of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew,the story opens with the tragic death of Clorinda’s mother who had borne her lord and master many girls but no male heir. Clorinda grows up to turn her father’s opinion of women on its head.

Author Rating: D

The Roaring Boy (read 2/15/10) AVOID

Edward Marston is the author of numerous mysteries set in the Elizabethan period and featuring Nicholas Bracewell. Based on having read this one — an insult to the reader’s intelligence — I would recommend avoiding this author.

The story starts out reasonably enough but soon devolves into pure stupidity. The characters are neither true to the period nor to human nature in general. Given the number and nature of the typographical errors, it would seem that the editor and proofreader didn’t see any point in putting any effort to clean it up.

Author Rating: C

Memoirs of a Bow Street Runner: The Thief Taker (read 11/16/09) meh

The story is set in London, in June 1815 and the protagonist, Henry Morton, is a Bow Street Runner who, in discovering who murdered Halbert Glendinning, finds his career and his life threatened by parties who prefer Glendinning’s death remain a mystery.

I have no real complaints. It’s competently written but I just didn’t find it in any way compelling.